AWS Athena

Amazon Athena is a serverless, interactive query service that allows you to analyze data in Amazon S3 using SQL. It enables you to analyze large amounts of data stored in S3 with a pay-per-query pricing model, making it cost-effective for querying data sets that are infrequently accessed. Athena supports several data formats including CSV, JSON, ORC, Avro, and Parquet. It also integrates with other AWS services such as Amazon QuickSight for data visualization, and AWS Glue for data cataloging. With Athena, you can query data in S3 without the need to move or load the data into a separate data store, making it easy to analyze large amounts of data stored in S3.

Features of Athena

Some of its features include:

  • Serverless: Athena is a fully managed service, so there is no infrastructure to provision or manage.
  • Interactive querying: Athena allows you to run ad-hoc queries and get results in seconds.
  • Standard SQL: Athena supports standard SQL, making it easy for users who are familiar with SQL to get started.
  • Scalable: Athena can handle large amounts of data and concurrent queries, and automatically scales up and down based on query demand.
  • Integrations: Athena integrates with other AWS services such as Amazon QuickSight, Amazon Redshift Spectrum, and AWS Glue.
  • Low cost: Athena charges only for the amount of data scanned per query, so you pay only for what you use.
  • Secure: Athena encrypts data at rest and in transit, and integrates with AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) for fine-grained access control.

AWS Athena pricing

AWS Athena is a pay-per-query service, meaning that you only pay for the amount of data scanned by each query. The cost is based on the amount of data scanned, rounded to the nearest megabyte, with a minimum charge of $5 per TB scanned.

In addition to the pay-per-query charges, there may be additional charges for data storage and data transfer. Data storage charges are incurred for the data stored in the Athena data catalog and the data stored in Amazon S3 that is queried by Athena. Data transfer charges are incurred when data is transferred out of the Amazon S3 bucket where the queried data is stored.

It’s also good to note that for cost optimization, you can partition your data and convert it to columnar formats like Apache Parquet or ORC, that are more efficient for analytics workloads, which will lower the amount of data that needs to be scanned and reduce the cost of running queries.

AWS Athena Example

AWS Athena is a serverless, interactive query service that allows you to analyze data in Amazon S3 using standard SQL. Here is an example of how to use Athena to query data stored in S3:

  1. Create an S3 bucket and upload your data files to it.
  2. Create a new table in Athena using the CREATE TABLE statement. You will need to specify the S3 bucket location and the format of your data. For example:
     CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE mydatabase.mytable
    (col1 INT, col2 STRING, col3 DOUBLE)
    ROW FORMAT DELIMITED
    FIELDS TERMINATED BY ','
    LINES TERMINATED BY '\n'
    LOCATION 's3://mybucket/data/'
  3. Run a query against your table using the SELECT statement. For example:
    SELECT col1, col2, col3 FROM mydatabase.mytable WHERE col1 > 10;
  4. Athena will return the results of your query, which can then be displayed or saved to a new table.

You can also use AWS Glue Crawlers to create, update and delete the table in Athena automatically.

AWS Athena charges for the amount of data scanned by each query, so it is recommended to use query optimization techniques, such as partitioning and compressing data, to minimize the amount of data scanned and reduce costs.

AWS Athena vs. AWS Glue

AWS Athena and AWS Glue are both managed services offered by Amazon Web Services, but they serve different purposes.

AWS Athena is a query service that allows you to analyze data in Amazon S3 using SQL. It allows you to analyze data stored in S3 using standard SQL without the need to set up and maintain any infrastructure. This makes it easy to run ad-hoc queries and analyze data in real-time.

On the other hand, AWS Glue is a data integration service that allows you to extract, transform, and load (ETL) data. It allows you to create and run a job that can extract data from a source, transform it into a format that is more useful, and then load it into a data store such as S3 or a data warehouse such as Redshift. It also allows you to create and maintain a catalog of data sources, which can be used by other AWS services, such as Athena, for querying.

In summary, AWS Athena is used for querying data stored in S3 using SQL, while AWS Glue is used for ETL and data integration. They can be used together, where Glue is used to prepare and organize the data, and Athena is used to query it.

AWS Athena vs. MySQL

AWS Athena and MySQL are two different services offered by Amazon Web Services.

AWS Athena is an interactive query service that makes it easy to analyze data in Amazon S3 using SQL. It allows you to analyze data stored in S3 using SQL queries, without the need to set up any infrastructure or load data into a data warehouse. It is a serverless, pay-per-query service that allows you to analyze data using standard SQL.

MySQL, on the other hand, is a relational database management system (RDBMS) that is commonly used to manage structured data. It is a traditional, on-premises database management system that is typically used to store and manage data that is structured in tables, with rows and columns. It requires setting up the infrastructure, managing and scaling the database, and maintaining it.

In summary, Athena is a serverless, pay-per-query service that allows you to analyze data stored in S3 using SQL, while MySQL is a traditional, on-premises RDBMS that requires setup, management, and maintenance. They are suited for different use cases and purposes.

AWS Athena vs Redshift

AWS Athena and Amazon Redshift are both data warehousing solutions offered by Amazon Web Services, but they have different use cases and capabilities.

Athena is a serverless, interactive query service that allows you to analyze data stored in Amazon S3 using standard SQL. It is designed for ad-hoc querying and does not require any infrastructure or setup. It is also cost-effective as you only pay for the queries you run.

Redshift, on the other hand, is a fully managed, petabyte-scale data warehouse service that is designed for high performance and large scale data warehousing. It uses a columnar storage and parallel query execution to deliver fast query performance. It also allows you to scale up or down depending on your needs. Redshift is more geared towards running complex queries and joins across large datasets, whereas Athena is more focused on simple and quick ad-hoc queries.

In summary, Athena is a good choice for simple and cost-effective ad-hoc querying, whereas Redshift is a more powerful and scalable solution for large-scale data warehousing and complex queries.

 

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