AWS EBS

Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) is a block storage service provided by AWS. It allows users to create and attach virtual storage volumes to their Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances, providing persistent storage for their applications.

Here are some key features and benefits of using EBS:

  • Persistent storage: EBS volumes are persistent, meaning that data stored on them is retained even if the EC2 instance is terminated. This makes EBS suitable for applications that require a high level of data durability.
  • Snapshots: EBS allows users to create snapshots of their volumes, which can be used to create new volumes or restore data in case of failure.
  • Multiple volume types: EBS offers different volume types, each optimized for different workloads. For example, General Purpose SSD (gp2) volumes are suitable for most workloads, while Provisioned IOPS SSD (io1) volumes are optimized for high-performance, I/O-intensive workloads.
  • Automatic backups: EBS allows users to automatically back up their volumes using a feature called “EBS snapshots”.
  • Flexible: EBS volumes can be easily resized and moved between instances, allowing users to adapt to changes in their storage needs.
  • Use cases: EBS is used for a wide variety of use cases, such as storing data for databases, file systems, and applications.

AWS EBS is a simple and cost-effective service that provides persistent storage for EC2 instances. EBS offers multiple volume types, each optimized for different workloads and use cases. It provides features such as snapshots and automatic backups. It can be easily resized and moved between instances, allowing users to adapt to changes in their storage needs. EBS is used for a wide variety of use cases, such as storing data for databases, file systems, and applications.

 

Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS)

Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) offers several different volume types, each optimized for different workloads and use cases. The main EBS volume types are:

  • General Purpose SSD (gp2) volumes: These are the default EBS volume type, and are suitable for most workloads. They offer a balance of performance and cost, and are ideal for a wide variety of workloads, including small and medium-sized databases, development and test environments, and boot volumes.
  • Provisioned IOPS SSD (io1) volumes: These volumes are optimized for high-performance, I/O-intensive workloads, such as large databases and enterprise applications. They offer a higher level of IOPS (input/output operations per second) and lower latency than gp2 volumes, but at a higher cost.
  • Throughput Optimized HDD (st1) volumes: These volumes are optimized for large, sequential workloads, such as big data and data warehouses. They offer a higher level of throughput than gp2 and io1 volumes, but at a lower cost.
  • Cold HDD (sc1) volumes: These volumes are optimized for infrequently accessed data, such as backups and disaster recovery. They offer a lower cost than other volume types, but at a lower performance level.
  • Magnetic (standard) volumes: These are the original EBS volume type, and are suitable for infrequently accessed data, such as backups and disaster recovery. They offer the lowest cost per GB of storage among the EBS volume types, but at a lower performance level compared to other volume types.

 

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