Top 10 Most Common US Penny Errors

Double Die Obverse (1955):
The 1955 Double Die Obverse features a noticeable doubling of the date and inscriptions due to a misalignment during minting.

1972 Lincoln Cent with a Doubled Die Obverse:
A notable error in 1972 where the obverse (front) of the coin displays doubling of the entire design.

Off-Center Strikes:
Pennies occasionally have off-center strikes, where the design is not centered on the coin due to errors in the minting process.

Blank Planchet or Wrong Planchet:
Some pennies may be struck on blank planchets (unprepared coin blanks) or the wrong planchets intended for another denomination.

Clipped Planchet:
A clipped planchet error occurs when a portion of the coin's metal is missing, resulting in an irregularly shaped penny.

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Die Breaks and Cuds:
Die breaks and cuds are raised, irregular features caused by damage to the dies used in the minting process.

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Off-Metal Errors:
Pennies struck on metals other than the standard copper-plated zinc planchet, such as bronze or silver, are considered off-metal errors.

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Die Clash:
Die clash errors happen when the dies collide without a coin in between, leaving faint impressions of the design on the coin's surface.

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BIE Cent (1959-1982):
Some pennies from 1959 to 1982 show a die crack resembling the letters "BIE" between the designer's initials (FG) on the reverse.

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Repunched Mint Marks:
Errors in which the mint mark on the coin appears to have been stamped more than once, resulting in overlapping or doubled mint marks.

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