Vintage slang phrases we should definitely bring back

Heading 3

Heading 3

Heading 3

Heading 3

Heading 3

Hotter than Dutch love in harvest - The phrase "hotter than Dutch love in harvest" dates back to the '60s and means excessively hot weather.

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 3

Give someone the wind - To "give someone the wind" is to jilt a suitor. Or in other words, to ghost your last Tinder date!

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Know your onions - How about bringing this back from the 1920s? This phrase means "to know what's up" or "what's going on."

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Pang-wangle - Whenever you're having a bad day, make sure you "pang-wangle." It means to live or go along cheerfully in spite of minor misfortunes.

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Take the egg - This delightful bit of Victorian slang means "to win."

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Crapulous - Originating back in the 1530s, "crapulous" means that you ate or drank too much of a good thing. You feel crapulous!

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Canceled stamp - Dating back to the '20s, a "cancelled stamp" is a shy or introverted girl.

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

In the ketchup - "In the ketchup" means "in the red," or "operating at a deficit."

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Claws sharp - "Claws sharp" was a '50s term to describe someone who was well-informed on a variety of topics.

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Gigglemug - "Gigglemug" is Victorian slang, which referred to a person who was always smiling.

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Cop a mouse - Also dating back to Victorian times, "cop a mouse" means to "get a black eye."

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Focus your audio - To "focus your audio" means "to listen carefully." Good one!

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Fly rink - Back in the '20s, a "fly rink" was a polished bald head.

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

To have one’s shirt out - This British slang from the 1850s means "to be angry." It was also popularly used in Australia.

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Give a body the flesh creep - Dating back to the 1700s, "give a body the flesh creep" means the shivers. So you can use it when you're cold or scared.

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Click Here