Why everyone should nap

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Nap types - There are many different forms of naps, including the recovery nap, the prophylactic nap, and the appetitive nap, which is taken for pure pleasure.

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Timing is everything - The length of time that we nap for has massive implications for how it will affect us because we move through different cycles in our sleep.

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Recovery - With this in mind, the best amount of time to nap for recovery is from around 10-20 minutes. It's enough to feel a little bit refreshed and rested.

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The elderly benefit hugely - Their health and nighttime sleep can improve from napping for 30 minutes between 1 pm and 3 pm in the day.

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Children need a lot of sleep - Children require a lot of sleep. Their bodies are growing, and so are their brains. 

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Infants - It’s entirely normal for infants to nap from one to four times in the day, and these naps can last from anywhere from 30 minutes to two hours.

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Toddlers - Three-year-olds need 10-13 hours of sleep a night. If they don’t get this at night, it’s crucial to catch up with naps during the day.

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Napping for improved emotional regulation - When a child is moody, we send them for a nap. Napping has the same benefit for adults. 

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It's great for memory - Napping also helps us with learning and in forming new memories.

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Napping for new connections - Napping helps with managing to make connections in the brain with information that is taken in. 

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Napping for work - Many large companies have taken note of how it can benefit employees to nap (and therefore the company too), so they help them do so. 

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It takes practice - Getting used to napping takes time. People have to learn to nap efficiently to not fall asleep for hours at a time, for example.

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The body adapts - Eventually, the body gets used to it and will be able to relax and learn to do it efficiently, and waking up afterward becomes easier.

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Quality of sleep - As adults, we should get seven hours of sleep every night, which most adults don’t get.

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Sleep apnea - For example, someone with sleep apnea may sleep for seven hours a night but never actually enter REM sleep.

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Daytime tiredness - If you’re tired, a nap is good for you. You shouldn’t be exhausted in the daytime consistently, or ignore why you’re tired in the first place. 

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