Words that are much older than you think

Heading 3

Heading 3

Hang out - "Hanging out" is nothing new. Charles Dickens mentions it in the 'Pickwick Papers' (1837): "I say, old boy, where do you hang out?"

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Dude - In 1880's Britain, a "dude" was basically a high-class dandy—a person with a particular appearance and mannerisms.

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 3

Babe - "Babe," as a word used to describe an attractive woman, sounds pretty old school.

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 3

Heading 3

Heading 3

Puke - The word "puke" has been around ever since the 16th century. It has had the same meaning ever since: to vomit.

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

D'oh - Homer Simpson's signature expression is older than you might think: the word was actually found in a BBC radio script from 1945.

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Funky - "Funk" was slang from the 1600s used to describe a variety of unpleasant smells, including tobacco smoke, cheese, or even ship’s quarters.

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Fly - The term "fly" has been around ever since the 1800s. It has been used to describe cool, knowledgeable, fashionable, and overall attractive individuals.

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Tricked out - "Tricked out" (and other variants, such as "tricked up") has been used as a verb ever since the 1500s. It meant to dress, adorn, or decorate.

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Rap - No, people were not rapping back in 1787, but they were using the word to describe a conversation (as a shortened version of "repartee").

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Outasight - The first records for "outasight" can be traced back to the 1890s. Those top hats were definitely outasight!

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Hubby - This way to address one's husband can be found in Edward Ravenscroft’s 1681 play 'The London Cuckolds.'

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Wifey - And the word "wifey" is also an old one. It can be found in the late 1700s and appears in Robert Burns' poems.

Heading 2

Heading 2

Heading 2

Click Here